StoppingPower.net Forums
Home
Forums
Commentary
H&S
About
StoppingPower.net Forums

StoppingPower.net Forums - m1 carbine
StoppingPower.net Forums
StoppingPower.net Forums
Forums Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ | Invite a friend
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Shooting
 The Rifle Rack
 m1 carbine
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Previous Page | Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 3

Jim Higginbotham
Moderator

USA
9431 Posts

Posted - June 27 2017 :  07:43:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've had a couple of friends who were avid Carbine Collectors.

One of them, when I lived near Memphis, had all 11 makers (2 made so few they are often left out of the list);

Some claim there were actually 12 makers. I understand the confusion.

It has been close to 40 years so forgive me if my recall isn't perfect:

Irwin-Pedersen which made about 3,000 carbines (none accepted by inspectors I think?) but I have held one - didn't get to fire it.

The other is Rochester - those were actually made by Nat. Postal Meter but the receivers were marked Rochester.

NPM also made some with receivers marked "C.C.C." (Commercial Controls Corporation).

But all of those are really NPM carbines with different receivers.

It was either Ithaca or Union Switch and Signal (I think maybe the latter) that made some receivers for Quality Hardware so that adds to the confusion - they had a strange maker stamp but I forget what it was.

Jim

Get the Weaponcraft Journal on Amazon: Print or Kindle!
Go to Top of Page

LittleBill
Advanced Member

4375 Posts

Posted - June 27 2017 :  08:52:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim, that strange stamp was 'Un-Quality': Union Switch-Quality Hardware.

Those of us who catch the 'carbine bug' find ourselves in a world of--- I'm tempted to say 'countless', but I suspect there's someone out there who's counted them--- variations; and where no manufacturer made all the 50-something parts, so it's hard to tell what's 'original.'

I just bought a Winchester made in the fall of '44 (serial # 5,799,XXX) that looks to maybe be one of those rare ones that's never been refurbished--- no import marks or arsenal-refurb stamps, it's still got the push button safety, by that time Winchester was installing the bayonet lug and adjustable sights at the factory--- but who knows? I'm buying it to shoot, not collect, but it's got my curiosity up....


"Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at its testing point"--- C.S. Lewis

"There are some ideas so foolish that only an intellectual could believe them"--- George Orwell

Slow Is Smooth, Smooth Is Fast

Edited by - LittleBill on June 27 2017 10:01:40 AM
Go to Top of Page

gw
Advanced Member

3984 Posts

Posted - June 27 2017 :  10:04:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by carlojohn90

I just picked up a new AO M1 carbine paratrooper. I've only put 150 rounds through it, but so far, so good. I'm faster at 25 yards with than the M4. My only dislike is are the small apertures on the front sight. If anybody knows of a rear sight with a larger aperture, and possible a higher visibility front sight, please let me know.



contrary to popular opinion the carbine was not sighted at the factory, neither is the M4. the rifle must be sighted by the end user.


on the carbine that is accomplished by filing the front sight. the L sight is to be used in two positions one 150 and 300 yards. once the front sight is adjustd to length for the 150 yard leg the 300 yard is calibratd as well. same for the adjustable sight it should be calibratd with the front sight. new AO carbines are the same.

AO made carbine parts during the war, current mfg is not the same. parts made by AO today are cast and not the same quality. not all surplus parts fit the new AO. bolts especially are unsafe if headspace is not adjusted.

the new manufactured AO and current Inland use the same cast reciever and parts. the casting mold used was bought from IAI and does not cast the alignment mark required to properly index the barrel during assembly. if the barrel is not indexed properly it can/will lead to a broken extractor. it will normally hold up for about 500 rounds before failure. check barrel alignment with a spirit level, return to AO if not correct.

[b]the tappet should be checked as well on the AO, they are not always shipped properly stacked[/b].

Physically check the gas piston nut to make sure it's tight. The nuts used by AO and the new Inland do not include the recessed
areas specific for staking and holding the nut in place that was mandatory on carbines made to Ordnance specifications
during and after WWII. Check that the nut is tight before you
fire the carbine and periodically thereafter to make sure it stays in place.

while many GI parts do not fit some will. I would and have upgraded AO carbines with GI parts. the AO magazine catch is a casting and prone to failure, replace it with a GI type IV, while you're there replace the push button safety with the lever type.

I also upgrade to the type 3 barrel band ( seen as an accuracy enhancement) and install a milled recoil plate over the cheap casting. a proper recoil plate hangs the reciever correctly, improves both accuracy and reliability. Also replace recoil spring with GI surplus for luck.

The L sight is servicable but the adjustable is available.

all these parts are a few bucks and can be found at Numrich, surplus gi parts were produced in large numbers.

with the barrel indexed correctly and the tappet stacked the current AO and new Inland are ok, but not to the quality of the original GI carbines, unfortunately after years of abuse not all GI carbines are what they used to be, they can require some tune up too.

"Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not..."

Edited by - gw on June 27 2017 10:07:17 AM
Go to Top of Page

Uncle Mike
Advanced Member

USA
1604 Posts

Posted - June 27 2017 :  10:49:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi gw, according to Larry Ruth in his great book "War Baby" they were sighted in at the factory. He talks about "Underwood's Unique Firing Ranges" on page 113 volume I. Col. George in "Shots Fired in Anger" talks about sighting in a Carbine in the field which was the prudent thing to do, regards, Mike

"The secret of happiness is freedom, and the secret of freedom, courage"...Thucyides

"War is sweet to those who do not know it."...Erasmus
Go to Top of Page

gw
Advanced Member

3984 Posts

Posted - June 27 2017 :  12:46:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Mike

Hi gw, according to Larry Ruth in his great book "War Baby" they were sighted in at the factory. He talks about "Underwood's Unique Firing Ranges" on page 113 volume I. Col. George in "Shots Fired in Anger" talks about sighting in a Carbine in the field which was the prudent thing to do, regards, Mike



the factory normally provided a rough 100 yd zereo for acceptance. the front sight was installed too tall and fired at a 16"x12" bull (or something along those lines.) if the carbine kept 5 of 7 in the bull it met specs, if low the front sight was filed to bring the carbine sights into spec. Irwin-Pederson actually replaced the front sight rather than file it, but you find the sights filed in the field. typically you saw something like poa/poi to 8 inches high.

unit armors were allowed to adjust sights before deployment, if you picked one up over seas who knows.

I've had a loose theory that stopping power reports are the result of poorly zeroed carbines, poor placement, or out right misses. ammo specs/changes between wars played with carbine zeros as well.

The Ordnance Department’s Modification Work Order for installation of the adjustable rear sight on already-issued carbines, dated 11 September 1944, states: “Carbines should be targeted if facilities exist and time permits. If facilities do not exist for targeting, the organization should be instructed to zero the carbine and target it on the range. The weapon will generally shoot low after installation of the new rear sight, in which case the front sight should be filed for zero at 100 yards with the rear sight set at the 100 yards setting. The top of the front sight may then be blackened by painting with lusterless black synthetic enamel. If the weapon shoots high with rear sight at 100 yard setting, weapon should be sent to base shop for replacement of front sight.”

Overseas “field replacement” of the “flip” rear sight with the adjustable rear sight began during the winter of 1944-1945, but the majority of carbines did not have this modification done until post-war rebuilding. In addition to the adjustable rear sight being added, the original front sight was pulled off to allow the bayonet lug barrel band to be installed. A random new or used front sight was reinstalled, but unfortunately for today’s shooters, there was no requirement for the carbine to then be re-targeted.


"Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not..."
Go to Top of Page

LittleBill
Advanced Member

4375 Posts

Posted - June 27 2017 :  1:48:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
gw, thanks for all that helpful info!

Sounds like current-production AOs are best avoided. How many folks buying them realize that they need to be 'repaired' with old parts before they can be relied on?

Are modern-made Inlands any better? Is there any currently-manufactured M1 carbine that's made to the same quality standard as the old ones were?

Plus--- for me at least--- there just seems to be something 'special' about an old gun....


"Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at its testing point"--- C.S. Lewis

"There are some ideas so foolish that only an intellectual could believe them"--- George Orwell

Slow Is Smooth, Smooth Is Fast

Edited by - LittleBill on June 27 2017 1:52:21 PM
Go to Top of Page

gw
Advanced Member

3984 Posts

Posted - June 27 2017 :  2:54:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by LittleBill

gw, thanks for all that helpful info!

Sounds like current-production AOs are best avoided. How many folks buying them realize that they need to be 'repaired' with old parts before they can be relied on?

Are modern-made Inlands any better? Is there any currently-manufactured M1 carbine that's made to the same quality standard as the old ones were?

Plus--- for me at least--- there just seems to be something 'special' about an old gun....





the AOs are ok with some tinkering, but I've had a couple that went back to mfg for " adjustment"

I can only assume the new Inland is simular, they use most if not all the same parts including receiver.

to be fair I've needed to do some minor rework on the old guns too, they get worn out after 60-70 years ( I know the feeling)

I've owned a bunch of nice carbines, but years ago folks started offering $300-$400 for guns I paid $50-$60 bucks for so I let them.....oops

"Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not..."
Go to Top of Page

Uncle Mike
Advanced Member

USA
1604 Posts

Posted - June 27 2017 :  4:38:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gw

quote:
Originally posted by Uncle Mike

Hi gw, according to Larry Ruth in his great book "War Baby" they were sighted in at the factory. He talks about "Underwood's Unique Firing Ranges" on page 113 volume I. Col. George in "Shots Fired in Anger" talks about sighting in a Carbine in the field which was the prudent thing to do, regards, Mike



the factory normally provided a rough 100 yd zereo



I've had a loose theory that stopping power reports are the result of poorly zeroed carbines, poor placement, or out right misses. ammo specs/changes between wars played with carbine zeros as well.







Hi, as for the above statement. I guess Larry Ruth is right? or maybe?

Your "loose theory", I think you are 100% correct. I've thought the same.
I've seen M1 Carbines recently for sale on the CMP forum around $800. Recently a nice Inland was sold for $795 shipped in the Carbine section. I don't see the reason to get a new mfg. carbine unless it's better than the original. In 1973 I returned a National Ordnance M1 Carbine copy when a kindly Gunsmith showed me the difference between a GI slide and a repo, regards, mike

"The secret of happiness is freedom, and the secret of freedom, courage"...Thucyides

"War is sweet to those who do not know it."...Erasmus
Go to Top of Page

Ace
Advanced Member

USA
5049 Posts

Posted - June 27 2017 :  10:07:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So which model would suffice strictly for a shooter, no worries about 'using up' a collector, no deep interest in everything being original or historic? As stated earlier, I'm kinda sliding down the slippery slope of maybe replacing the AR with a .30 Carbine. If I do, any manufacture would suit me; think of it as 'if I have to use it, I won't worry about it when the cops confiscate it for a while.' Ace

Give me $1 every time a Liberal lies, I'll give you $5 every time one tells the truth; I'll end up a wealthy man, you'll end up broke.
Go to Top of Page

Badge
Advanced Member

USA
1648 Posts

Posted - June 27 2017 :  11:32:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For what this is worth and I'm no expert. I worked with a former Marine BAR Gunner, Korean era and he refused a 1911 as he said he wanted something to shoot farther more accurately so an Inland Carbine he carried. I bought the bring home and foolishly traded it away. My dad on the other hand hated the Carbine. He too was a WW2 and Korean Vet and swore by the M1 rifle. Said it lacked " smack ". Two Marines. To points of view. Personally I like it but I am not a combat Vet.

MSS
Go to Top of Page

jle3030
Advanced Member

USA
4992 Posts

Posted - June 28 2017 :  03:55:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One reason I like the carbine as a car gun is its reputation for perforating auto bodies. I figure if I have to pull a long gun out of the rear of the vehicle, there are likely to be other vehicles nearby for my opponent(s) to use as cover/concealment.

Which raises a question: .30 carbine ball ammo has a reputation for penetrating auto bodies. But what about the JHP or JSP loads? I don't recall seeing any data on those loads.

Jeff

Jeff

jle3030
Go to Top of Page

LittleBill
Advanced Member

4375 Posts

Posted - June 28 2017 :  07:38:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ace

So which model would suffice strictly for a shooter, no worries about 'using up' a collector, no deep interest in everything being original or historic? As stated earlier, I'm kinda sliding down the slippery slope of maybe replacing the AR with a .30 Carbine. If I do, any manufacture would suit me; think of it as 'if I have to use it, I won't worry about it when the cops confiscate it for a while.' Ace


Ace, I'm far from being an expert, but here's my thinking for those who are interested in carbines as shooters rather than collectibles.

Over the course of their 3-year 'lifespan', there were a several changes made to them which most folks seem to agree were improvements:

1) The original flip two-setting rear sight was replaced by a sliding rear sight adjustable for both windage and elevation.

2) The original barrel band was replaced by a larger one that included a bayonet lug. The newer one with the lug is reputed to give greater accuracy.

3) The original push button safety--- which apparently is easy to confuse under stress with the push button mag release, so instead of taking the safety off you drop the mag--- was replaced by a rotating lever safety.

As I understand it, towards the end of the War (1944) changes 1 and 2 began to be incorporated by some of the manufacturers. Then following the war, all three changes were typically done as part of arsenal refurbs.

So in terms of 'handiness', you may want to look for one that has those 'new improved' features. Which works out well money-wise, in that (as I understand it) many collectors prefer the original versions that don't incorporate any of these changes. Replacement rear sights and lever safeties are also available as used USGI parts to make those alterations yourself.

I've heard too it's best to avoid those with import marks, as some imports come back in poor shape. Then again, there's a couple imports on Gunbroker right now with good-to-excellent bores.

Like I said, I'm just learning about this stuff. Anyone who knows more please feel free to chime in and correct me.

LB


"Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at its testing point"--- C.S. Lewis

"There are some ideas so foolish that only an intellectual could believe them"--- George Orwell

Slow Is Smooth, Smooth Is Fast

Edited by - LittleBill on June 28 2017 08:45:54 AM
Go to Top of Page

LittleBill
Advanced Member

4375 Posts

Posted - June 28 2017 :  08:49:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One thing I do know for sure: the 'carbine bug' is highly contagious!

And I hate to be the one to break the news to you, Ace.... but it sounds like you may have already got it....

Then again, there's an upside: you can always tell Mama, "Don't blame me, I can't help myself! It's a disease...."


"Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at its testing point"--- C.S. Lewis

"There are some ideas so foolish that only an intellectual could believe them"--- George Orwell

Slow Is Smooth, Smooth Is Fast

Edited by - LittleBill on June 28 2017 08:53:29 AM
Go to Top of Page

gw
Advanced Member

3984 Posts

Posted - June 28 2017 :  09:33:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ace

So which model would suffice strictly for a shooter, no worries about 'using up' a collector, no deep interest in everything being original or historic? As stated earlier, I'm kinda sliding down the slippery slope of maybe replacing the AR with a .30 Carbine. If I do, any manufacture would suit me; think of it as 'if I have to use it, I won't worry about it when the cops confiscate it for a while.' Ace



do yourself a solid and down load a copy of TM 9-1276. it's the ordinance inspection manual. it will give you info on what to check on new and used carbines.

a real issue will be good magazines. surplus GI are great and cost more than Obama Care. the new Korean made ain't bad but I haven't seen any lately.

if your talking about a GI gun any mfg is good, a CMP gun is prefered, but the reimports can be ok. the barrel stamp on the reimports can damage the barrel but if condition is good they are ok. many are obviously beat up. the US never made corrosive carbine ammo, but France and others did, reimports can have rough bores, and the things were cleaned from the muzzle so muzzles can be damaged. the usual military surplus stuff.

if it's a real collector the price should let you know, although some guys think all carbines are gold plated. I bought a CMP carbine at a show near Anniston a few years ago for $600 but it needed work and was the cheapest he had.

there are plenty of reimports in Korea, rumor is Mr Trump might let them back in, Mr Obama wouldn't

you could by a rough one cheap and have it rebuilt by someone like Fulton Armory.

or if money was no object you could buy an actual Fulton Armory carbine. they have mil spec milled receivers made by LMT and new Criterion barrels. other components are mostly surplus. these exceed war time guns, CNC machines didn't exist in 1942...

Springfield Armory in Geneseo IL made carbines with the same receivers, but some of their early guns had cast receivers from National Ordinance and are up and down. find one with a 6 digit serial number starting with SC and you got a gem.

all th early commercial carbines used surplus parts with cast receivers. some are real good, the early Universals were ok, if you find one of those with double recoil springs it has repo parts, probably problematic....

or just buy a new AO carbine, check it out and shoot the snaught out of it. if it breaks send it back, they have good warranty repair and the rifle should be right after in my limited experience. one good tell on those is wood quality. if the wood is full of knots or worm holes I'd skip it. early guns used nice Boyd stocks, when they cut cost they went to lower grade Altimont stocks. my theory is overall quality went down with the wood.

the new Inlands might be ok, I've never seen one





"Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not..."
Go to Top of Page

LittleBill
Advanced Member

4375 Posts

Posted - June 28 2017 :  11:12:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gw

quote:
Originally posted by Ace

So which model would suffice strictly for a shooter, no worries about 'using up' a collector, no deep interest in everything being original or historic? As stated earlier, I'm kinda sliding down the slippery slope of maybe replacing the AR with a .30 Carbine. If I do, any manufacture would suit me; think of it as 'if I have to use it, I won't worry about it when the cops confiscate it for a while.' Ace



do yourself a solid and down load a copy of TM 9-1276. it's the ordinance inspection manual. it will give you info on what to check on new and used carbines.




Amazon's got 'em for $8 shipped. And several places online have a pdf version as a free download.


"Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at its testing point"--- C.S. Lewis

"There are some ideas so foolish that only an intellectual could believe them"--- George Orwell

Slow Is Smooth, Smooth Is Fast

Edited by - LittleBill on June 28 2017 11:15:23 AM
Go to Top of Page

Ace
Advanced Member

USA
5049 Posts

Posted - June 28 2017 :  12:43:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys. Ace

Give me $1 every time a Liberal lies, I'll give you $5 every time one tells the truth; I'll end up a wealthy man, you'll end up broke.
Go to Top of Page

revjen45
Advanced Member

2234 Posts

Posted - July 02 2017 :  09:22:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I worked with a Viet Nam vet who swore by the M2. Said it worked just great when he absolutely had to hose somebody/something down most rikki-tik.

Better to perish in the struggle for freedom than live to see defeat.
Go to Top of Page

Jim Higginbotham
Moderator

USA
9431 Posts

Posted - July 02 2017 :  10:12:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by gw

quote:
Originally posted by LittleBill

gw, thanks for all that helpful info!

Sounds like current-production AOs are best avoided. How many folks buying them realize that they need to be 'repaired' with old parts before they can be relied on?

Are modern-made Inlands any better? Is there any currently-manufactured M1 carbine that's made to the same quality standard as the old ones were?

Plus--- for me at least--- there just seems to be something 'special' about an old gun....





the AOs are ok with some tinkering, but I've had a couple that went back to mfg for " adjustment"

I can only assume the new Inland is simular, they use most if not all the same parts including receiver.

to be fair I've needed to do some minor rework on the old guns too, they get worn out after 60-70 years ( I know the feeling)

I've owned a bunch of nice carbines, but years ago folks started offering $300-$400 for guns I paid $50-$60 bucks for so I let them.....oops




I looked over a new Inland last year - did not shoot it - it looked very much like the AO and was pretty crude looking though it cost about $900 - I think I'll stick with the G.I.

I had a Universal once , my second carbine. It worked OK but I shot it a lot and that op rod (or whatever you call it) riveted. Easy to fix but at some point I traded it off and kept my original Inland.

I've added several since. One is a first year Winchester but I have only fire it a little.

Jim

Get the Weaponcraft Journal on Amazon: Print or Kindle!
Go to Top of Page

Jim Higginbotham
Moderator

USA
9431 Posts

Posted - July 02 2017 :  10:19:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by revjen45

I worked with a Viet Nam vet who swore by the M2. Said it worked just great when he absolutely had to hose somebody/something down most rikki-tik.



When I first moved back to KY one of the deputies had a registered M2. He offered it to me for $400 but I did not want to do the paperwork - what a dummy!

Another friend has one (not for sale) and I've shot it a little bit. I'm not much of full auto but it is pretty nifty in the carbine...at least up close.

Jim

Get the Weaponcraft Journal on Amazon: Print or Kindle!
Go to Top of Page

Chris Christian
Advanced Member

USA
2938 Posts

Posted - July 02 2017 :  12:31:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think the M1 Carbine could be a dandy PDW. But, after reading through this entire thread I have come to the conclusion (rightly or wrongly) that anyone purchasing an MI Carbine today has to (1) Be very knowledgeable about every possible variation ever made (2) Be a competent gunsmith who knows the M1 Carbine in and out and can attest to its worthiness & operational function , or (3) Be lucky.

Since I am "None of the above" I'll stick with my ARs. And, that's a shame, because that handy little rifle... from what I remember from my military days... is sweet! I just wish I could be sure of getting one that works.


Chris Christian
There are those who make things happen. There are those who watch things happen. There are those who wonder What The Heck happened! Pick one.

Edited by - Chris Christian on July 02 2017 12:32:44 PM
Go to Top of Page

LittleBill
Advanced Member

4375 Posts

Posted - July 02 2017 :  1:00:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chris, you're right, more care is required when buying a 75-year-old firearm, compared to buying a new one. Especially one that may have survived extreme sustained combat, or may have been exported overseas and subjected to who-knows-what level of neglect before being imported back.

The reason to do so would be that no other weapon is quite like it, no other weapon (that I'm aware of) quite fills the niche that the carbine does.

And the good news is, because of the carbine's popularity over the last 75 years, there are plenty of folks out there qualified to make those discernments. Buy one warranted to be in good shape, from a reputable source, should be pretty safe bet.

My understanding is, which variation you buy doesn't matter if all you're wanting is a good shooter.

The biggest danger that I can see is the possibility of contracting 'carbine-itis': whose symptoms include developing a compulsive, insatiable interest in all those variations that collectors love to obsess over.

But among all the various possible addictions to be had out there, a person could certainly do worse....



"Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at its testing point"--- C.S. Lewis

"There are some ideas so foolish that only an intellectual could believe them"--- George Orwell

Slow Is Smooth, Smooth Is Fast

Edited by - LittleBill on July 02 2017 1:06:31 PM
Go to Top of Page

silverback
New Member

USA
79 Posts

Posted - July 02 2017 :  6:21:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gentlemen does anyone have any experience with the Kahr M1 carbine?Not hear say but real hands on.Thanks
Go to Top of Page

jle3030
Advanced Member

USA
4992 Posts

Posted - July 02 2017 :  6:58:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I got my Blue Sky reimported Postal Meter carbine some years back for $195.00. Marked down because the previous owner had defiled its collectability by (quite nicely) refinishing the stock. The gun shoots fine and if it ever stops, I figure I can still find enough ex GI parts for a rebuild and still make out financially.

Magazines are a hit and miss proposition. Is there a good mag rebuild kit out there?

Jeff

jle3030
Go to Top of Page

ajt
Junior Member

USA
207 Posts

Posted - July 02 2017 :  9:07:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was looking for an M1 at the last GS I attended. Found a number of them ranging in price between $400 and $1200, some of which appeared to be in pretty rough condition - mainly stock-wise. They all had smooth actions and good bores - no pitting visible and the rifling visible. I couldn't figure what the differences were between all of them, other than manufacturer. A couple of the sellers struck me as real hucksters though, and I put off buying until I could find out more about them and/or get a more knowledgeable person to accompany me and give me another opinion of them. Found more 'expertise' here than anywhere. ajt
Go to Top of Page

Uncle Mike
Advanced Member

USA
1604 Posts

Posted - July 02 2017 :  11:04:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi ajt, I have found that the less you do to stocks the better. I usually wipe them down with mineral spirits then give them a few coats of BLO, boiled linseed oil, regards, Mike

"The secret of happiness is freedom, and the secret of freedom, courage"...Thucyides

"War is sweet to those who do not know it."...Erasmus
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 3 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
StoppingPower.net Forums © 2002-16 StoppingPower.net, Inc. Go To Top Of Page
Thispagewasgeneratedin0.52seconds. Snitz Forums 2000