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CharlieX
Senior Member

USA
781 Posts

Posted - March 16 2009 :  2:34:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Alternative Small Arms Lubricants

Synthetic motor oils are subjected to extreme conditions present inside operating internal combustion engines. These include but are not limited to:


-Thermal Stress
-Extreme Pressure and Wear
-Oxidation and Corrosion
-Combustion Product Contamination


Since firearms operate strictly within the boundary lubrication regime and not the hydrodynamic lubrication regime, it appears that synthetic motor oils should possess the necessary attributes (including detergency, rust and corrosion inhibition and adequate film and barrier strengths) to serve successfully as alternative small arms lubricants.

While not all of the synthetic motor oils and compounds listed below rise to meet all of the following evaluative performance criteria, they are for the most part, adequate for the application since the internal operating environment of firearms is generally far less severe than that of internal combustion engines.


Evaluative Criteria:

1. Pour Point (PP): The lowest temperature (Fahrenheit) at which a lubricant will flow.
Minimum requirement: -50.00 F

2. Flash Point (FP): The lowest temperature (Fahrenheit) at which a lubricant will produce vapors that, if subjected to an ignition source, will ignite and combust.
Minimum requirement: +400.00 F

3. Viscosity at 100F (V100): The viscosity (in centistokes, cSt) of a lubricant at 100F.
Minimum requirement: 25.00 cSt

4. Viscosity at 212F (V212): The viscosity of a lubricant (in centistokes, cSt) at 212F.
Minimum requirement: 5.00 cSt

As a point of reference, the kinematic viscosity of pure water at:
68F (room temperature) is 1.004 cSt
100F is 0.658 cSt
212F is 0.294 cSt

5. Thermal Service Range (TSR): The sum of the absolute values of the Pour Point (PP) and the Flash Point (FP).
Minimum requirement: 450.00 F

6. Viscosity Index (VI): An arbitrary numerical value assigned to a lubricant indicating its ability to retain its viscosity across a specified temperature range.
Minimum requirement: 110.00 (Very High)

Low VI: 35 or lower
Medium VI: 35-80
High VI: 80-110
Very High VI: 110 or higher

7. Molybdenum (Mo): An anti-wear/extreme pressure (AW/EP) additive.
Concentrations are expressed in parts per million (ppm).
Preferred requirement: 45 ppm

8. Boron (B): An anti-wear/extreme pressure (AW/EP) additive.
Concentrations are expressed in parts per million (ppm).
Preferred requirement: 50 ppm

9. Phosphorus (P): An anti-wear/extreme pressure/corrosion inhibitor (AW/EP/CI) additive.
Concentrations are expressed in parts per million (ppm).
Preferred requirement: 2,000 ppm

10. Zinc (Zn): An anti-wear/extreme pressure/corrosion inhibitor (AW/EP/CI) additive.
Concentrations are expressed in parts per million (ppm).
Preferred requirement: 2,000 ppm


Data for Alternative Small Arms Lubricants:

AMSOIL 10W40 (MCF)
PP: -51.00 F
FP: +453.00 F
V100: 93.36 cSt
V212: 13.90 cSt
TSR: 504.00 F
VI: 153
Mo: ~45 ppm

ENEOS 0W50
PP: -49.00 F
FP: +449.60 F
V100: 104.00 cSt
V212: 18.00 cSt
TSR: 498.60 F
VI: 192
Mo: ~45 ppm

MOBIL 1 0W50 "RACING"
PP: -65.20 F
FP: +429.80 F
V100: 100.00 cSt
V212: 17.20 cSt
TSR: 495.00 F
VI: 189

M1 5W30 Extended Performance
PP: -49.00 F
FP: +451.40 F
V100: 64.40 cSt
V212: 11.20 cSt
TSR: 500.40 F
VI: 168
Mo: 80 ppm

MOBIL 1 10W40 (MX4T)
PP: -65.20 F
FP: +487.40 F
V100: 86.00 cSt
V212: 13.80 cSt
TSR: 552.60 F
VI: 166
Mo: ~80 ppm
Manufactured to inferior specifications as of 09/2010


MOBIL 1 20W50 (VTWIN)
PP: -59.80 F
FP: +518.00 F
V100: 130.00 cSt
V212: 17.70 cSt
TSR: 577.80 F
VI: 151
Mo: ~80 ppm
Manufactured to inferior specifications as of 09/2010


MOBIL 1 SYNTHETIC GREASE
Freezing Point: -40 F
Dropping Point: +550.00 F
V100: 220.00 cSt
V212: 23.80 cSt
TSR: 590.00 F
VI: 135
Reversibility: ~85.00 %
Washout (H2O): 6.00 %
NLGI Rating: #2
Thickener: Lithium Complex
Corrosion prevention test; ASTM D 1743: Pass
Color: Red

PENNZOIL PLATINUM 5W30
PP: -38.20 F
FP: +435.20 F
V100: 57.50 cSt
V212: 10.30 cSt
TSR: 473.40 F
VI: 169
Mo: ~50 ppm

PENNZOIL PLATINUM 5W50
PP: -43.60 F
FP: +435.20 F
V100: 106.00 cSt
V212: 17.80 cSt
TSR: 478.80 F
VI: 186
Mo: ~50 ppm

RED LINE 5W20
PP: -49.00 F
FP: +484.00 F
V100: 55.00 cSt
V212: 9.10 cSt
TSR: 533.00 F
VI: 147
Mo: ~500 ppm

RED LINE 5W30
PP: -49.00 F
FP: +486.00 F
V100: 62.00 cSt
V212: 10.60 cSt
TSR: 535.00 F
VI: 163
Mo: ~500 ppm

RED LINE 5W40
PP: -49.00 F
FP: +480.00 F
V100: 94.00 cSt
V212: 15.10 cSt
TSR: 529.00 F
VI: 170
Mo: ~500 ppm

RED LINE 10W30
PP: -49.00 F
FP: +480.00 F
V100: 70.00 cSt
V212: 10.70 cSt
TSR: 529.00 F
VI: 143
Mo: ~500 ppm

RED LINE 10W40
PP: -49.00 F
FP: +478.00 F
V100: 93.00 cSt
V212: 14.60 cSt
TSR: 527.00 F
VI: 164
Mo: ~500 ppm

RED LINE 15W40
PP: -49.00 F
FP: +486.00 F
V100: 97.00 cSt
V212: 14.50 cSt
TSR: 535.00 F
VI: 156
Mo: ~500 pm

RED LINE 15W50
PP: -49.00 F
FP: +486.00 F
V100: 138.00 cSt
V212: 19.60 cSt
TSR: 535.00 F
VI: 163
Mo: ~500 ppm

RED LINE 20W50
PP: -49.00 F
FP: +489.20 F
V100: 138.00 cSt
V212: 18.60 cSt
TSR: 538.20 F
B: 20 ppm
Mo: 500 ppm
P: 2100 ppm
Zn: 2500 ppm
VI: 152

ROYAL PURPLE 5W30
PP: -40.00 F
FP: +455.00 F
V100: 65.30 cSt
V212: 11.00 cSt
TSR: 495.00 F
VI: 163
Mo: ~125 ppm

ROYAL PURPLE 10W30
PP: -40.00 F
FP: +455.00 F
V100: 70.30 cSt
V212: 10.70 cSt
TSR: 495.00 F
VI: 142
Mo: ~125 ppm

ROYAL PURPLE 15W40
PP: -44.00 F
FP: +435.00 F
V100: 110.10 cSt
V212: 14.90 cSt
TSR: 479.00 F
VI: 141
Mo: ~125 ppm

ROYAL PURPLE 20W50
PP: -35.00 F
FP: +435.00 F
V100: 170.00 cSt
V212: 20.20 cSt
TSR: 470.00 F
VI: 138
Mo: ~125 ppm

MILITEC-1 (for comparison purposes only)
PP: -45.00 F
FP: +455.00 F
V100: 43.41 cSt
V212: 5.63 cSt
TSR: 500.00 F
VI: 63


Revised 01.19.2011 (added M1 0w50 "Racing")

Regards,



Edited by - CharlieX on January 22 2011 5:10:41 PM

Evan
Administrator

34116 Posts

Posted - March 16 2009 :  2:46:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thanks-when I was on the road as part of a mobile training team I'd just go to Wally world and buy Mobil 1- never paid attention to weight and it always worked fine. Maintained 100+ M4's.

"The greatest thing a Father can do for his children is to love their Mother."

Harold B. Lee

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CharlieX
Senior Member

USA
781 Posts

Posted - March 16 2009 :  2:56:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You're welcome, Evan.

Everything you never wanted to know about synthetic motor oils and then some.

I made sure to include your "favorite"; M1 5W30.



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Evan
Administrator

34116 Posts

Posted - March 16 2009 :  3:17:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
a bud who had been an armor for a secret squirrel outfit turned me on to Mobil One.

"The greatest thing a Father can do for his children is to love their Mother."

Harold B. Lee

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Doc Lee
Advanced Member

USA
1284 Posts

Posted - March 16 2009 :  4:35:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Charlie, Thank you! I appreciate your taking the time to post this data.

Doc Lee
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CharlieX
Senior Member

USA
781 Posts

Posted - March 16 2009 :  5:43:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You bet, Doc.



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elsullo
Junior Member

USA
243 Posts

Posted - March 16 2009 :  6:48:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Are these oils "polarized?" Supposedly, polarized oils self-spread and penetrate and stick better than "ordinary" oils, due to a slight static-charge attraction. Several popular gun oils, like Outers, claim to be polarized, and Castrol GTX "Start-up" oil boasts heavy polarization to "cling" to cold engines. Is polarization important, or just a gimmick?

Also worth noting is that motorcycle-specific oils have a much higher dose of lithium and phosphorus to deal with gearbox shearing, since there is no separate gearbox oil compartment, and a catalytic converter is not used. Are motorcycle oils of any benefit, considering that they are twice the cost?...................elsullo
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Doc Lee
Advanced Member

USA
1284 Posts

Posted - March 16 2009 :  9:59:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Charlie, I thought alkenes are C double bond C with a cis or trans configuration. AKA unsaturated hydrocarbons.
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miragetex
Junior Member

USA
100 Posts

Posted - March 16 2009 :  10:47:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Charlie, thanks for all your work in putting this together. Now, for those of us who didn't follow the chemical engineering path in school, what should I use on my guns? In particular, would the same one be the best choice for, say, an AR, an M1 carbine, or a levergun, or would they benefit from different ones? I note the Red Line products seem to have much more Molybdenum, but does "no required minimum" mean this doesn't matter? I bought (but haven't yet opened) a quart of Mobil 1 0-40 wt., on the perhaps misguided thought that the 0 viscosity end would work better in cold weather, but the 0-40 seems to be pretty marginal in some categories. I apologize in advance, because I'm pretty sure you don't want to pick a "best" product, but I lack the background to make the best use of all the information you've gathered. As I often say, I'm not sure I understand all that I know about this. Again, though, I really appreciate you sharing your time, effort and knowledge.
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Doc Lee
Advanced Member

USA
1284 Posts

Posted - March 16 2009 :  10:55:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Charlie, I again want to again thank you for your efforts posting this informative list and subsequent fill in information. Doctors Orders: "get a good night's sleep."
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CharlieX
Senior Member

USA
781 Posts

Posted - March 17 2009 :  12:06:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by miragetex

Charlie, thanks for all your work in putting this together. Now, for those of us who didn't follow the chemical engineering path in school, what should I use on my guns? In particular, would the same one be the best choice for, say, an AR, an M1 carbine, or a levergun, or would they benefit from different ones? I note the Red Line products seem to have much more Molybdenum, but does "no required minimum" mean this doesn't matter? I bought (but haven't yet opened) a quart of Mobil 1 0-40 wt., on the perhaps misguided thought that the 0 viscosity end would work better in cold weather, but the 0-40 seems to be pretty marginal in some categories. I apologize in advance, because I'm pretty sure you don't want to pick a "best" product, but I lack the background to make the best use of all the information you've gathered. As I often say, I'm not sure I understand all that I know about this. Again, though, I really appreciate you sharing your time, effort and knowledge.




miragetex-

You are welcome.

The "short answer" is that you can use whatever you like from the list and have a high level of confidence that it will work. The lubricants listed above perform in far more strenuous environments than our firearms are capable of generating.

The "long answer" is that the evaluative criteria above were established according to what I believed to be the most stringent constraints that I could apply while remaining as realistic as possible. There is nothing that prohibits anyone from relying on those criteria or establishing their own as they apply to their own situation.

The molybdenum-based AW/EP compounds present in these lubricants will perform as they should and provide more than ample protection of the surfaces that they are applied to. My inclusion of molybdenum levels was simply for those seeking to make an "informed decision" as to whether they wish to employ a lubricant that has molybdenum in its composition.

These oils (may) also contain other AW/EP compounds such as Organic Sulfur-Phosphorus-Nitrogen compounds, Borates and Borate Esters, Tricresyl Phosphates, Amine phosphates, and other phosphate esters that serve the same purpose and I did not include these values for fear of going well beyond a "lay" explanation of these lubricants qualities and confusing those needlessly who might read this topic.

For example, per the most recent VOAs (Virgin Oil Analysis) that I've seen, the Mobil 1 20W50 (VTWIN), while it contains "only" 90 ppm Molybdenum, also has within its composition, a nominal concentration of ~1800 ppm Zinc (Zn) and ~1650 ppm Phosphorus (P) which indicates a "healthy" concentration of ZDDP in its formulation. It is hardly "lacking" in AW/EP additives to be sure and molybdenum ain't "the only game in town" to be sure. The inclusion of the molybdenum concentrations is just an added dimension, that's all.

As for a "recommendation": The best that I can do for you is tell you what I "prefer".

For very cold weather hunts or shooting, I prefer to use Mobil 1 Jet Oil II. At $15.00 per quart, it is, in my humble opinion, though hard to find, the best there is. If the temperature makes it to -75 F, I suspect that I'll have more pressing concerns than my rifle's functionality.

For very hot conditions and/or where my "volume of fire" is both heavy and sustained (like my prairie dog hunts in June or July), I prefer Mobil 1 20W50 (VTWIN) or as a second choice Mobil 1 10W40 (MX4T).

I used Mobil 1 20W50 (VTWIN) while on safari in the Selous in Tanzania during late 2002 and it performed admirably in that role on my heavy rifle, a Winchester Model 70 Classic Stainless calibered in .375 H&H. I used that rifle, so lubricated, to stop a Cape Buffalo (37") charge that started from some 200 feet away at my first shot and ended six shots later at just under 15 feet. I never had a moment's concern over its use in that rifle or my .30-06 medium rifle.

If I found myself "stuck" with Mobil 1 5W30 because it was "all that I could find" in any of these contingencies, I'd not think twice about using it and enjoy myself.

You are correct in your supposition that the M1 0W40 will give you good performance in colder environments as it will "behave" like a 0-weight oil in extreme cold and as a 40-weight in extreme heat. If the M1 0W40 appeals to you, use it. I'd hardly call it "marginal" since it is current "factory fill" on many modern high performance sports cars like Porsche.


Regards,



Edited by - CharlieX on March 17 2009 12:50:13 AM
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perrodelucha
Senior Member

USA
927 Posts

Posted - March 17 2009 :  6:14:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
thanks Charlie! that was alot of work and i want to tell you that i appreciate it. thanks again.
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Doc Lee
Advanced Member

USA
1284 Posts

Posted - March 17 2009 :  7:19:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Charlie, which lubricant type will be most effective in preventing stainless against stainless steel galling?
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CharlieX
Senior Member

USA
781 Posts

Posted - March 18 2009 :  12:04:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
perrodelucha,

You are quite welcome.

Your gratitude and the demeanor of those on this website in general are why I so enjoy contributing and being a member here. Your thanks and appreciation is my reward and I consider myself amply rewarded.

I used to visit many of the other firearms websites with much greater frequency, but the anger and vitriol (not to mention the profanity and rudeness so often encountered there) keeps me away from them more than ever before, especially these days.

I am glad that I can provide what I can in the way of information in a venue where learning is the goal and is also its own reward.

Doc,

Hmm, good question.

Though I am not a metallurgist by any remote stretch of the imagination (my degree is in Clinical Psychology with minors in Chemistry, Physics and the Russian language), my limited understanding of the issue is that the issue of galling has been mitigated in current manufacture by the use of differing grades of stainless when the two parts that must come into contact with each other during functioning are both fabricated of stainless steel.

Here's "my take" on your question-

First of all:

In stainless steels you have the following families:
300-series are called AUSTENITIC stainless steels and have the best overall corrosion resistance.
400-series are called MARTENSITIC stainless steels and can have both good hardness and some corrosion resistance.
PH-series are called PRECIPITATION HARDENING stainless steels and can be "aged" to a moderate hardness while retaining good corrosion resistance.

What makes each of these steels useful is their ability to be either “soft” or “hard” and that depends upon their respective heat treatment which governs the ability of the steel to change its crystalline structure. (all metals are crystalline)

There are three crystalline "states" in steels. These are:
1. Ferritic (Body Centered Cubic) BCC
2. Austenitic (Face Centered Cubic) FCC
3. Martensitic (Body Centered Tetragonal) BCT

Generally speaking, BCC is “soft” and BCT is “hard”. FCC is a transitional structure present during heat treatment when the steel is orange-red hot around 1350 F - 1900 F. Simply put, you begin with a Ferritic (BCC) crystalline structure and when you heat it up to "orange-red" hot it changes to an Austentic face centered structure (FCC). When quenched, usually in oil, it changes from an Austenitic structure to a Martensitic structure.

After you quench the steel and make it martensitic, it needs to be tempered. Using a "moderate" heat operation on the order of 350 F to 1100 F, the strength of the martensitic structure is reduced somewhat but, this also allows it to regain some ductility and toughness. Unquenched martensitic steel is quite brittle and rather delicate. Higher temperatures employed during tempering results in achieving a “softer” temper. Conversely, lower temperatures yield a higher or "harder" temper.

It is necessary to select a tempering temperature that will yield a certain hardness range, but before you go saying that you want your rifle barrel (for example) as hard as possible you should remember one thing. While a lower temperature tempering (in the 250 F - 300 F range) will certainly get you a really high hardness, it won't last long after your first rapid-fire session and when you exceed the tempering temperature, the steel will soften and possibly suffer a distortion under the stress of this "process".

The use of different stainless steels that come into contact with each other gets by the galling issue due to the difference of inherent grain hardness (asperites) in each of them. The galling or chatter marks that plagued earlier production firearms occurs when the similar grain hardness of the stainless steel grade shears against itself in both parts. Something has to "give" and one of the two wear faces of the parts will shear which causes the damage. By having two different stainless steels (series of differing hardness) one (the harder of the two) “cuts” the other (the softer of the two) and by “yielding”, the harder of the two suffers little wear while the softer of the two “takes the hit”. For areas of such contact, I’d suggest the use of the Mobil 1 Synthetic lithium complex grease as your "best bet" for that application.

Perhaps there are members present on this forum who are more knowledgeable in this field than I who can correct me if I am in need of it and provide some further insight into this metallurgical phenomena.


Regards,



Edited by - CharlieX on March 19 2009 1:10:14 PM
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Doc Lee
Advanced Member

USA
1284 Posts

Posted - March 18 2009 :  01:43:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Charlie, your post above is very informative. I appreciate your taking the time to explain the differing families of stainless steel. My concerns about galling come from the 1970s and a .44 Auto Mag I owned. I returned the first pistol, due to galling, and the second one did not seem to suffer from the degree of galling. More recently I've assembled several SS 1911s and not had any signs of galling. My current lube is Miltec grease for the SS pistols I own.

Thank you very much for your complete and informative answer.

Doc Lee
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perrodelucha
Senior Member

USA
927 Posts

Posted - March 18 2009 :  8:34:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Charlie, i wish you were closer so i could shake your hand. you don't see many people these days that go out of their way to help somebody else. when you do find someone like this you need to be sure they know you are grateful. people like the guys we have here make the world a better place.
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CharlieX
Senior Member

USA
781 Posts

Posted - March 18 2009 :  8:49:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by perrodelucha

Charlie, i wish you were closer so i could shake your hand. you don't see many people these days that go out of their way to help somebody else. when you do find someone like this you need to be sure they know you are grateful. people like the guys we have here make the world a better place.



perrodelucha-

I'll consider my hand properly "shaken" simply by virtue of what you've posted above.

Thanks.



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wolfgang2000
Advanced Member

USA
3742 Posts

Posted - March 19 2009 :  06:35:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Doc FP-10 was originally formulated to combat galling. (I met the designer at the 1993 Shot show.) However the the FP-10 presently in production is not the original formula, is it made by the same person.

He has a new lube out. I'll have to get you the name when I get back from work.

“The key is to hit them hard, hit them fast, and hit them repeatedly. The one shot stop is a unit of measurement not a tactical philosophy.” Evan Marshall
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Doc Lee
Advanced Member

USA
1284 Posts

Posted - March 19 2009 :  08:30:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce, thanks for the input concerning FP-10. To the best of my knowledge, FP-10 is still available. It's supplied by Shooters Choice in a black bottle while another (older) preparation was supplied in a white bottle.
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Evan
Administrator

34116 Posts

Posted - March 19 2009 :  10:32:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As John Farnam pointed out that in an emergency you can remove the dip stick from your vehicle and lube your firearms.

"The greatest thing a Father can do for his children is to love their Mother."

Harold B. Lee

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CharlieX
Senior Member

USA
781 Posts

Posted - March 19 2009 :  1:06:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Evan

As John Farnam pointed out that in an emergency you can remove the dip stick from your vehicle and lube your firearms.



Evan,

Glad that you mentioned this detail as it brings up an important point that I failed to address in my original post.

Please be certain to wash throughly after such an "emergency use" of used motor oil. Used motor oil contains PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and other carcinogenic "nasties" that are not the best thing to have next to or on your skin. Ranks right up there with lead poisoning in my book.

Brand new unused motor oil, on the other hand, is fairly innocuous "stuff" having a very low level of toxicity (LD50 is > 5,000 mg/kg) although this can hardly be construed as a recommendation for its use as a "mixer" in one's favorite beverage.


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wolfgang2000
Advanced Member

USA
3742 Posts

Posted - March 20 2009 :  9:31:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Doc Lee

Bruce, thanks for the input concerning FP-10. To the best of my knowledge, FP-10 is still available. It's supplied by Shooters Choice in a black bottle while another (older) preparation was supplied in a white bottle.



Doc first sorry for the tardy reply. I know FP-10 is sold by Shooters Choice. According to the designer it is no longer the original formula. He now has a oil called Weapon Shield. steelshieldtech.com is his home page. I haven't been there recently, he use to have comments on the differences.

CharlieX thanks. good stuff

“The key is to hit them hard, hit them fast, and hit them repeatedly. The one shot stop is a unit of measurement not a tactical philosophy.” Evan Marshall
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Doc Lee
Advanced Member

USA
1284 Posts

Posted - March 20 2009 :  10:30:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bruce. I'll take a look at the Weapon Shield web site.
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GLV
Moderator

USA
8866 Posts

Posted - March 21 2009 :  1:08:14 PM  Show Profile  Send GLV an ICQ Message  Send GLV a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Doc, if I remember right, the galling problem can be solved by hard chrome job on the rails.

'the world is round everywhere'

'The meek will inherit the earth, but only after the last soldier has left it to them in his will'
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Doc Lee
Advanced Member

USA
1284 Posts

Posted - March 21 2009 :  1:26:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George, thank you for the information. Hard chrome seems like it would be an excellent way to protect the rails from galling.

Doc Lee
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12XLR8
Starting Member

USA
21 Posts

Posted - July 30 2009 :  04:09:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello guys i'm new to this forum. I just want to take this time to say Hello. I have a quick question though. I have heard that you shouldn't use WD40 on weapons because if it gets on your bullets primer it might fail to fire. How will motor oil ( mobile 1 ) compare. Currently i'm using CorrosionX, and so far it works great. Any information is greatly appreciated Thanks. CharlieX great information!
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