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T O P I C    R E V I E W
Ten Driver Posted - August 27 2017 : 02:30:46 AM
Hello Folks,

My friend and I have been working on a blog dedicated to revolvers, and we've got a few entries that you might enjoy if you're a wheelgun fan. Please take a look and let us know what you think. The approved link is in the Website References subforum.

Thanks!
Mike
25   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
LittleBill Posted - December 10 2017 : 11:14:47 AM
Sure... after 8 years of The Greatest Gun Salesman Ever— or perhaps I should say, in the spirit of Identity Politics which is sweeping our nation, The Greatest African-American Gun Salesman Ever— things were bound to slow down.

The only thing that might conceivably top Obama’s achievement would be, say, ‘The Greatest Transgender Gun Salesperson of Color’— say, if Hillary had won, “transitioned” to a male, and “identified” as a POC— which, even given “the remarkable strides we’ve made”, seems a bit too much to hope for....

So back to reality.... All things being equal, as a patriotic American, concerned for our economy, and the efect this inevitable downturn is having on my fellow citizens, I consider it my sacred duty to keep on buying guns, Barack or no Barack.

But when a company that used to produce great guns, decides the smart thing to do is to cut back on quality, and hope nobody notices the diference... I’d rather do my part in driving up the prices of the older ones....

“I may be dumb, but I’m not stupid!”

Pop Pop Posted - December 09 2017 : 8:14:28 PM
This happens every time there is a feast market(8yrs Obama). They never make the transition and cut back production soon enough. All of the big companies are down in sales.
WR Moore Posted - December 09 2017 : 7:51:15 PM
The glass is half full types (bulls) would regard this as a buying opportunity. Remington is in even worse shape.
LittleBill Posted - December 09 2017 : 4:56:33 PM
This from the New York Post:

“The company that owns gun maker Smith & Wesson got hammered by investors Friday after it revealed its earnings plunged 90 percent in the most recent quarter.

Shares of American Outdoor Brands, which changed its name from Smith & Wesson early this year, saw its shares drop 9.5 percent to $13.51 as it revealed net income in the quarter ended Oct. 31 fell to $3.2 million from $32.5 million a year ago.

The gun maker reported a 36.4 percent decline in sales — to $148.4 million — driven by nearly a 50-percent drop in the company’s firearms segment.”

WR Moore Posted - November 28 2017 : 1:37:49 PM
Just ran across this thread. About the new manufacturing....I spent several years as a production and prototype machinist and much longer as a gunsmith. The CNC machines have both higher production than the average machinist working with manual machines and MUCH better dimensional tolerances. At least so long as the setup person knows their stuff. Even back in the old days it wasn't unusual to employ a setup specialist to set the machine tooling and a machine operator to produce the parts. Sometimes "machine operator" was a title that wasn't deserved.

I'm old enough to remember sintered parts as produced by Colt & Dan Wesson. Sintering was putting metal powder into a mold and heating it. If you got the temperatures just right, good part. All too often, you got something that looked like a good part, but once the surface layer wore, the underlying metal particles would just crumble away.

From what I've seen working on some of the S&W parts, MIM is in another class entirely. The parts I saw were well finished, harder than the hinges of heck to substantial depth and solid. They might not have the sentimental value, appearance or the ability to work with older non-MIM parts, but they're very, very good.

Some of what has happened is the manufacturers reaction to customer demand. There isn't all that much demand for revolvers, they are more expensive to produce and no one wants to pay what it costs to produce real quality. Remember two things: S&W gets around 1/3 of MSRP when the product leaves the plant and their primary drive is to stay in business. To do that, ya gotta keep the customers coming back. Fixing the occasional item that is less than stellar is cheaper than the alternative. i'll also note that everyone (H&H, Westley Richards et al excluded) produces the occasional clunker. The measure of quality is how fast and well they rectify their less than wonderful products.
LittleBill Posted - November 20 2017 : 4:30:50 PM


Looking forward to your writeup on the M19.... and the K6S....

Ten Driver Posted - November 20 2017 : 4:25:38 PM
So, YOU are the one who beat my bid!

Glad you're enjoying the site Bill, and hope you'll enjoy that "new" holster. Don Hume has always made great stuff. I have a few new Hume Jordan photos that we're going to retroactively add to that post in the next week or two.

Mike
LittleBill Posted - November 20 2017 : 3:59:35 PM
I don’t know about the thumbs-forward grip, but— inspired by one of your previous articles— I just scored a nice ‘vintage’ Don Hume Bill Jordan holster for my M19, for $25 delivered, on eBay! Gracias!

Ten Driver Posted - November 20 2017 : 2:16:40 PM
In the latest installment, Justin discusses the "thumbs forward" grip for revolvers. Let us know what you think.
Ten Driver Posted - October 24 2017 : 5:56:43 PM
Excellent! We're trying to do a release every Saturday. Thanks for making it a regular stop!

Mike
Jim Higginbotham Posted - October 23 2017 : 09:54:09 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Badge

Excellent site friend. It's on my daily to do list.



Ditto!

Jim H.
Ten Driver Posted - October 22 2017 : 9:23:44 PM
Thank you gents, that's very kind of you! We're having a heck of a lot of fun talking about revolvers and all the trappings over there, and I'm glad you're enjoying it too. We've got some fun stuff lined up in the next few months that I'm eager to share!

Mike
LittleBill Posted - October 22 2017 : 10:08:02 AM
Yep, Mike has definitely got ‘a way with words’!

Add to that, a ‘wealth of knowledge’: great stuff!

Ten Driver Posted - October 22 2017 : 09:16:37 AM
Ha! Thank you! I'm glad you enjoyed it.
jle3030 Posted - October 22 2017 : 08:59:39 AM
That's probably the best article I've read on the Jordan holster.

Great word crafting in the first paragraph. The first sentence in particular reminded me of Louis L'Amour.

Jeff
Ten Driver Posted - October 21 2017 : 11:44:03 PM
Latest article on RevolverGuy.com is about the Jordan holster, for all you gunleather guys! Enjoy!

Mike
LittleBill Posted - September 17 2017 : 11:35:36 AM
Got a chance to handle and dry-fire a Kimber K6S the other day. Nice little gun!

The trigger pull is somewhat different from other revolvers I'm familiar with. You can definitely feel what others have commented on, the way the cylinder lockup noticeably happens about 2/3 of the way through the trigger pull.

Because of this 'feature', in my short time messing with it, I found it easy to 'stage' my shots: bring it to that point, then pause until the sights were lined up and exert a small additional pressure to drop the hammer. Overall, the trigger impressed me as (relatively) short and light, and, except for that slight 'bump' upon cylinder lockup, smooth.

One downside I noticed: the model I was playing with had the factory Crimson Trace laser grips, and while the grip shape was OK, the way the laser activation button was situated on the grip didn't fit my hand well at all! When I took a 'natural' grip, my fingers didn't naturally hit the activation button: to activate the laser, I had to strain to bring my finger into contact with it. Awkward, not something I'd want to have to remember to do if I had to bring the gun into play fast.

Looking at the way my fingers fell on the grip, it seemed like that could be fixed with the addition of a pad on top of the activation button to bring it farther out. A lasergrip is handy to have on a snubbie.

All in all, a solid-feeling little 6-shot.
LittleBill Posted - September 06 2017 : 08:55:09 AM
quote:
Originally posted by jle3030

quote:
Originally posted by Ten Driver

Thanks Gents! I'm glad you enjoy it! We've got lots of material on tap and look forward to seeing you back. Please spread the word!

Mike

You could probably get a lot of mileage by occasionally recycling accredited excerpts from Keith, Skelton, and a few others. I guarantee it would be totally new material to many younger readers.

There is a certain timeless appeal to revolvers and I feel much of the old lore is being lost. For example, it took me a while to figure out why my old 1915 Colt New Service with the British broad arrow proofs, originally in .455 Eley, has such a goshawful heavy DA trigger pull.

Jeff


+ 1
jle3030 Posted - September 06 2017 : 08:24:09 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Ten Driver

Thanks Gents! I'm glad you enjoy it! We've got lots of material on tap and look forward to seeing you back. Please spread the word!

Mike

You could probably get a lot of mileage by occasionally recycling accredited excerpts from Keith, Skelton, and a few others. I guarantee it would be totally new material to many younger readers.

There is a certain timeless appeal to revolvers and I feel much of the old lore is being lost. For example, it took me a while to figure out why my old 1915 Colt New Service with the British broad arrow proofs, originally in .455 Eley, has such a goshawful heavy DA trigger pull.

Jeff
Ten Driver Posted - September 06 2017 : 03:07:25 AM
Thanks Gents! I'm glad you enjoy it! We've got lots of material on tap and look forward to seeing you back. Please spread the word!

Mike
Badge Posted - September 05 2017 : 11:14:06 PM
Excellent site friend. It's on my daily to do list.
Olddog84 Posted - September 05 2017 : 10:55:46 AM
Thanks for much for the new blog, it is bookmarked and I will come back frequently! I still keep a bunch of the good old revolvers on hand: S&W 29, 57, 24, 1950, 38/44, Python, Cobras, DS, etc. I don't carry them, the back problems make the polymer frame autos much easier to deal with, but if I had my druthers I sure would. I love to take them out and get some trigger time with them, it was in many ways a simpler and more elegant time. I totally concur that the guns of the post war through, say, mid 70's were so much better than what is being produced today. Since the revolvers are now fun guns for me, I would not pay a nickel for most of the stuff produced today. Keep up the great work!
Mike
gw Posted - September 04 2017 : 7:10:14 PM
quote:
Originally posted by LittleBill

quote:
Originally posted by Ten Driver

Thanks Pop Pop! I must confess to not owning any guns with fiber optics. I've shot some, but never warmed up to them very much. Maybe this would be something good for us to do a story on.

Regarding retrofitting your gun, I'm not sure of the make or model, but both S&W and Ruger are offering guns with fiiber optic sights now, so maybe you can get a factory fiber optic part to replace your existing sights with?

Jeff, you said it very well! There's just something about the older revolvers that's special.

GW, I don't mean to sound disagreeable, but I find that I'm more disappointed than impressed with the quality of the new production revolvers these days. I don't think I'm being sentimental, either. Fit, finish, trigger quality, materials--these rarely seem better than what we had been accustomed to in the past, at least in the revolver market.

Mike


My experience is not nearly as extensive as yours, but I'd have to agree: the differences between the old and the new are pretty striking.

I assume it's attributable to cost-cutting measures in the manufacturing process: since the range of available materials, and our knowledge base of how best to use them, have both been increasing, even as quality has been decreasing.

Surely they haven't forgotten the 'secret' to manufacturing a revolver to the high standards of yesteryear: they've just decided that it's not worth it to do so.





If you think current production S&Ws are not equal to the Bangor Punta guns made back in the 70s we do disagree

The new CMC cut guns carry up, lock up,and are as durable as ever.

If they'd ever give up the stupid lock they'd have it together, otherwise the metallurgy and engineering improvements considered they are making as good a gun as ever
Ten Driver Posted - September 04 2017 : 12:25:54 PM
Working on this as we speak, LB. I'll be sure to give you a heads up when I have something fit to print.

My only experience with the gun so far is shooting about 30 rounds through it at SHOT, which hardly qualifies me to say anything other than I was impressed enough to follow up on it.

Mike
LittleBill Posted - September 03 2017 : 12:01:31 AM
Maybe Kimber figured out that there's a market for a high quality revolver. I too hope that's the case.

I see the 3" version of the K6S is just hitting Gunbroker.


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